A Spotlight on MITF Fellow Manya Goldstein

“I love the feeling of satisfaction when the kids grasp a lesson or stop me in the hallway to try telling me something in English. Just seeing how excited they are to work with me is a big motivator,” said Manya Goldstein about why she enjoys teaching English with Masa Israel Teaching Fellows (MITF) with Ramah Israel at the Noam School, a religious public school for boys in Jerusalem’s Pisgat Ze’ev neighborhood.

Manya, who hails from Jacksonville, Florida, decided to apply for MITF after spending last summer in Jerusalem studying at the Nishmat Center for Advanced Torah Study for Women. In addition to wanting to teach English through MITF, Manya, 22, wanted to have the experience of living in Israel for an entire year. This is her first long-term stay in Israel, after having done a five-week summer volunteer program here with the Orthodox youth group NCSY when she was 15. 

“MITF seemed like an extremely fulfilling way to experience Israel and give back to the country. By the end of the year, I want to feel like I have made a difference in the lives of my students,” Manya said. 

Manya graduated from Rutgers University in January 2019 with a major in journalism and a minor in political science. At Rutgers, she was active with the Orthodox Jewish community on campus, and she has had a number of jobs in the journalism and communications field. Following her diagnosis in the first semester of her freshman year with Postular Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), an autonomic disorder that made everyday life extremely challenging with symptoms ranging from pre-fainting spells to extreme dizziness and fatigue, she became interested in entering the field of health communication to help people live healthy, flourishing lives. Manya’s published thesis on America’s processed food culture and chronic disease, has received over 66,000 views to date.

Manya is excited to be improving her Hebrew while in Israel. She’s learning from her MITF ulpan classes, and also from her students. “I started the program with beginner Hebrew and found it quite hard to communicate with the kids, who have very beginner English. But it’s turned out to be an incredibly special dynamic: the kids teach me Hebrew and I teach them English! I try to show them that it’s okay to be vulnerable and put yourself out there— that’s how we learn,” she said.

Living in an apartment in Jerusalem’s German Colony with nine other women has proved to be a lot of fun. The group enjoys hosting movie nights and Shabbat dinners together. In fact, Shabbat in Jerusalem has been a highlight.

“I definitely feel more spiritually connected here in Israel…My favorite time of the week is Friday evening when Shabbat starts and you can almost hear Jerusalem take a collective exhale. When you walk outside, everything seems so calm, slow, peaceful. It’s an incredible juxtaposition from the mad rush of the day,” she said.  

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